Posts Tagged ‘weight loss exercise’

By Charles Staley

Ever since the “jogging craze” of the ’70’s, aerobic exercise has been the method of choice for those attempting to “lose weight.” Gradually, the resistance training area of most gyms and clubs is being scaled back to accommodate all manner of equipment designed to elevate the heart rate. With the aerobic revolution in full gear, I feel compelled to ask, “Why are people getting fatter and fatter?”

For those who have critically studied sport training and exercise physiology, this is a rhetorical question.  A quick look at any national level track meet speaks volumes about the effects of aerobic versus anaerobic training.  Compare the physiques of 100 meter sprinters against long distance runners, such as marathoners. Although sprinters do little or no aerobic exercise (it’s not specific to their events), they are just as lean (if not leaner) than their aerobic counterparts. They also have more attractive physiques, which is a by-product of the muscle they’ve gained from hours in the weight room and short-term, intensive running. By contrast, the marathoner’s lack of muscle gives him a “flat” physique. His extensive and frequent forays into the aerobic zone have caused his body to lose muscle (since muscle weighs more than fat, it is the body’s preferred tissue to cannibalize in the interest in lightening the load).  If you’ve been trying (unsuccessfully) to lose 10 to 20 pounds of unwanted fat, despite spending hours upon hours on the stairclimber, read on. Anaerobic exercise may not be politically correct, but it IS physiologically correct—if fat loss is your objective.

Since our language affects the way we think, let’s begin by revising our vocabulary for a moment. I’d like to encourage you to delete a few words from your personal dictionary. Words like tone, shape, contour, sculpt, and all the rest of the vague descriptions you hear on late night infomercials. These terms are irrelevant with respect to the adaptations you can expect from any form of exercise. In reality, there are only two bodily tissues that you have two ways: You can gain, or lose. (By the way: tone simply refers to a state of partial, involuntary contraction, a result of muscular work. Even the most rotund can have muscle tone, and the thinnest people sometimes have no tone.)  So the goal is to gain muscle and lose fat. When you do so, let everyone else call you toned and sculpted.  Of course, many people, influenced by the exceedingly massive (and rare) physiques adorning the covers of muscle magazines, shirk at the prospect of gaining muscle. It’s a shame— myophobia keeps more people from achieving their fitness goals than any other single factor. Just a few pounds of added muscle can make a dramatic difference in your physique, not to mention your health and well-being. Muscle (unlike fat) needs calories to survive. The more muscle you have, the higher your metabolism will be. Bigger muscles burn more calories than smaller ones, even during sleep!

Personal trainers— people who earn their living by making substantial changes in their client’s bodies— regard resistance training as the most important item in their professional “toolbox.” Dave Sinnot, trainer of many top Hollywood stars, including Sean Penn and Angela Bassett, is amazed at people’s avoidance of weight training: “People who think that aerobic training is the ultimate fat loss method are totally missing the boat. I’ve worked with people who spend half their waking hours doing some form of aerobics.  They complain that they aren’t getting results anymore. As soon as we shift emphasis to weight training and nutritional modifications, they always start improving immediately. It’s like their body was begging for it!” Dave related to me that Angela Bassett (star of “What’s Love Got To Do With It”) was not blessed with great genetics as many people assume, and was actually “pudgy” when he started working with her.  What’s the best approach for people wishing to improve their body composition? First, don’t eliminate your aerobic sessions. It’s a good practice to do a handful (three or four) of 20 to 40 minute sessions a week. More than that, and your body starts to drop valuable muscle in an effort to adapt. Second, take another look at your resistance training program. Most people simply don’t spend adequate time and effort in the weight room, and those that do make one or more of the following four mistakes:

1) Too many exercises: One exercise per muscle group per workout is plenty. The key is to pick the right exercises, and work them hard. Forget about “hitting the muscle from different angles” and “shaping” exercises— this is all propaganda stemming from bodybuilding circles.

2) Ineffective exercises: Don’t avoid so-called “hard core” exercises for fear of getting a result. Choose multi-joint exercises, such as squats and their variations, bench presses and their variations, lat pulldowns, and shoulder presses. Smaller muscles such as biceps, triceps, and calves will receive adequate exercise when you do the multi-joint movements mentioned above.

3) Insufficient intensity level: High reps DO NOT “tone” a muscle! For beginners, high reps are important to strengthen connective tissues, and to allow for technique mastery. But for optimum muscle building, stay in the 6 to 12 range for the majority of your workouts. If and when you get to the point where you don’t want additional muscle, just cut back on the volume and frequency of training.

4) Lack of progression and variety: If you don’t seek increases in strength, your body will stop responding. Similarly, if you train in exactly the same manner for extensive periods of time, your body will adapt to the monotony, and stop responding, no matter how good the training program is. For this reason, there is no perfect training program. Most successful trainers use several programs, which they rotate as needed.

As a final suggestion, remember that the entire personal training profession was founded upon the fact that resistance training works! Don’t make the mistake of thinking that you’re beyond benefiting from one. Personal trainers make their living by getting fast results for people. For information on finding a certified trainer in your area, please call the ISSA at (800) 892-ISSA.

Consider These Facts:

1) According to a recent study presented in IDEA magazine, the average female aerobics instructor has 18% bodyfat. This is higher than the average female competitive weightlifter (16%).

2) According to a recent study published in Muscular Development magazine, muscle necrosis (tissue death) and inflammation can be observed in the calves of marathon runners 7 days after a race.

3) According to Dr. Marc Breehl, a leading anesthesiologist specializing in cardiac surgery, the enlarged hearts of aerobic athletes are weaker, not stronger than those with anaerobic backgrounds.

4) Resistance training has numerous benefits to the heart and vascular system, including improved ejection fraction of the left ventricle, and improved elasticity of the arterial walls. This from Power: A Scientific Approach, by Dr Fred Hatfield.

5) Virtually everything we do in life is anaerobic. Aerobic activity is an artificial state which the human organism is not well adapted to. For the majority of individuals, loss of function associated with aging is due to lack of strength, not aerobic capacity.

Like I always say:   Get Strong Stay Strong!

Chris

Fat-Belly--4968

By Jeff Anderson “the Muscle Nerd”

Much research has been done into the seemingly impossible task of “spot reduction” of body fat.

You know…like how to burn fat directly off of your belly WITHOUT taking away from the butt you’re so proud of.

While experts have claimed that there’s no way to “spot reduce” where you’re able to take of the fat, recent studies are showing that it may in fact be possible.

For example, scientists have studied exactly WHERE fat is burned from in order to fuel certain activities.

It seems that there may be a unique connection where the fat cells in the location of the muscles being exercised may actually provide the bulk of the long term fuel for your training.

This is NOT definitive yet, but it holds promise.

It also supports my theory (and again, this is ONLY my theory!) that your MIND-MUSCLE CONNECTION plays a STRONG role in how much, and WHERE you can burn fat.

In this article, I reveal a unique tip that I use to increase the “mind-muscle” connection to (again, in theory) burn more belly fat from your training by implementing a crazy “cardio fat blaster”…

How To Burn More Belly Fat During Exercise

1. First, if you have my best-selling “Combat The Fat” program (www.CombatTheFat.com), you know that I’m a HUGE supporter of LOW intensity cardio as a fat-burner.

Sure, you can get your panties all in a wad while you preach to me about how HIGH intensity is better, but I lay out the FACTS in my book and the men and women who have used CTF know the real deal.

Anyhoo, I digress…

2. For this exercise session, you’ll do a quick, low effort warmup of about 5 minutes on a treadmill, bike, or other exercise equipment.

3. Next, do a set of WEIGHTED CRUNCHES until failure.  Just one single set.

crunch_weighted-1

4. Now, go and do a 10 minute LOW INTENSITY cardio activity that uses primarily either an upper body or lower body movement (e.g. – Rowing machine/jumping rope primarily works upper body while jogging, bike, works lower)

5. When 10 minutes are up, do one set of HANGING LEG RAISES (with your legs straight) to failure and then go on to your 2nd 10-minute bout of low intensity cardio using the opposite area of your body as your last set.

hanglegraise1s hanglegraise2s

(i.e. – if you jumped rope in your last cardio round, switch to an exercise like jogging on the treadmill this time.)

6. When done, do a single set to failure of HANGING ROTATIONAL KNEE RAISES…then on to your 3rd round of cardio using the opposite half of your body.

And so it goes on, switching back and forth between an abs exercise and low intensity cardio.

For your follow up abs exercises, I suggest (in order)…

=> Hanging Knee Raises

=> Either crunches or V-ups

As you can see, we slowly decrease the intensity of the abs exercise choices with each set as you get closer to the end of your workout.

But in essence, by training your abs throughout your cardio session, you send a “message” to your body WHERE you want all that fat-burning cardio to do most of it’s work.

You may think I’m crazy, but give it a try and see if it doesn’t make a difference in where your measurements start reflecting results!

Even though I’m a fan of high intensity, its always good to have some variety.  Jeff always has good info.

Get Strong! Stay Strong!

Chris

breakfast2-735821

By Bob Condor, AHJ Editor — Published: August 20, 2009

It’s a small study about how eating a certain type of breakfast can help you burn more fat, but it could nonetheless have a huge impact on losing unwanted pounds or maintaining a healthy weight. British researchers have determined that high-fiber, low-glycemic foods are best for kick-starting your weight-loss program. Keep reading to find out how eating high-fiber in the morning burns more fat during exercise.



One proviso: You only get the accelerated fat-burning benefit if you exercise. There is something about adding fiber and low-glycemic foods (items that digest slower and more evenly). 

The study was performed with physically inactive women who started an exercise program while also following one of two breakfast regimens: either a low-glycemic morning meal including muesli, milk, yogurt and canned peaches, or cornflakes and milk, white bread and jam and, a sweetened carbonated drink. 

Interestingly, both meals have equal amounts of carbohydrates, proteins and fats. The difference is the low-glycemic breakfast offers about 3.5 grams of fiber, which in turn leads to a more constant fuel source not only for your workout but, perhaps even more importantly, for your muscles to rebuild. 

The study, published in The Journal of Nutrition, tested women in an hour walk three hours after breakfast (that sounds a bit like lunchtime). When measured for biological and metabolic changes, the young women in the study (all 24 years old) oxidated significantly more fat and calories after eating the fiber-rich breakfast. 

Here’s an interesting thing that means this breakfast strategy can carry over to other parts of the day: After eating identical lunches, the women reported feeling more full on days when they also ate the low-glycemic breakfast. So you burn more fat and overeat less often at the next meal.

And you thought you could never be a breakfast eater.

Get Strong! Stay Strong!

Chris

kbinfo_tgu

Burn fat and look great too with this whole body exercise known as the Get Up.

One of my favorite applications is to set a timer for 5 minutes and do Get Ups alternating arms each rep.

You can also plug them into a circuit.  For example:

kettlebell-swing-sequence kettle_row(1)

20-30 Kettlebell Swings Followed by                          10-20 Alt. Renegade Rows

and finish with Get Ups for 5-10 reps each side.

Dont lollygag!  Work hard, push yourself and youll look and feel great!  If it was easy everyone would be doing it!!!!!!!!!!!

Enjoy!

Get Strong Be Strong!

Chris

By Matt Lisk
Author of The Burrito Diet

Stop Using Weight Machines!

Weight machines are sexy, sleek, shiny, and smooth. Perhaps that is why gym owners and lazy personal trainers have fallen head over heels in love with them.

Gym owners pack their gyms with these eye catching devices so that they could get more people into their gyms without having a large amount of trainers on staff. Those gym goers who do utilize personal training services often get a highly paid escort who walks them from machine to machine and adjusts the setting for them. Do you know how to spot a good trainer? One who never takes their clients to the weight machines!

Without getting too biological on you, your muscles do not work in isolation – they work in a chain of movement. The most evil of machines, the leg extension machine, is a prime example – it is just not a natural movement. It has absolutely nothing to do with how our legs are used in everyday life – for walking, climbing, and descending.

Don’t get me wrong – machines do have their place in the fitness world. However, they are most beneficial to two populations – bodybuilders who are looking to correct a deficiency or weak point, and physical therapy patients who are trying to rebuild strength and regain range of motion. They are not meant for people looking to lose fat!

People looking to lose fat need to utilize free weights, body weight exercises, and various other equipment like medicine balls, resistance bands, and balance trainers – essentially training movements not specific muscles.


Stop Using the Handles on Cardio Machines!

It cracks me up every time I see someone who is using a treadmill and is holding on to the bar in front of them for dear life with a white-knuckled grip. Maybe you’ve seen the people who are draped all over the stairmaster or stepmill with their arms, and their heads facing down while their back is unnaturally curved. There are even those who hold on to the siderails on the stepmills or elliptical machines and push up with their arms (or my all time favorites are the people who contort their arms so that their wrists are facing forward!)

What do these people all have in common? They are wasting their time! Bars are meant for balance only – not as a crutch to use when the going gets tough during exercise. When you walk or run outside, do you have anything to hold on to? Unless you run while pushing a shopping cart (very odd!) or stroller (if you must), let go of the handles. You’ll expend more energy and use more muscle, thus getting a more efficient and effective workout.

I know what you’re thinking – “What about the elliptical machines with the handles that pump back and forth? Don’t I get more of a calorie burn from them?” In short, no. Pumping your arms back and forth without touching the handles will of be far more benefit to burning fat.

And don’t use the handgrips on any cardio machine to get your heart rate – they will not be accurate. Instead, read on and follow my advice below.


Stop Doing Hours and Hours of Cardio!

Read this next statement carefully, then re-read it:

You should never spend more than 20 minutes doing cardio

Want proof? Simply put a picture of a marathon runner next to a picture of an Olympic sprinter (preferably one who is not using steroids!). Now, which person’s build would you rather have?

If you’re doing long bouts of cardio (more than 30 minutes at a slow and steady pace) you are burning muscle – muscle that is extremely vital to your fat burning efforts. Your “cardio”, rather than slow and steady, should be short bursts of hard effort followed by recovery. I will go into this much more in depth in future newsletter articles, and may even have an expert or two explain in detail why training this way is much more efficient for fat loss. For now, take my word for it that SLOW AND STEADY DOES NOT WIN THE FAT LOSS RACE!


Stop Reading / Watching TV / Using Your Mobile Phone While In the Gym!

The gym is the one place where multi-tasking is an absolute no-no! Shut your mobile phone off (or better yet, leave it in the car – many facilities are starting to ban mobile phones because people tie up equipment while using them, or worse, take pictures). Leave the magazines and newspapers at home. You only have a limited time at the gym – you should be focused on achieving your daily goals. To keep myself honest, I’ll use a stopwatch to time my between-sets breaks. Eliminate all distractions and your fat loss efforts will improve dramatically!


Never Workout Without Recording Your Results as You Go!

Whether you use a good old fashioned paper and pencil, or a tricked-out PDA, keep track of your workouts EVERY TIME you go to the gym.

A well-respected fitness expert (who we will hopefully be able to speak to during one of the upcoming teleseminars) speaks of setting personal records (or PRs as he calls them). Every time in the gym, you should be focused on doing a little bit more than you did the last time – a Kaizen approach to fitness. Let’s say you did 3 sets of 5 chin-ups in your last workout – you should strive for 3 sets of 6 chin-ups next time out. If you fail, that’s ok – the quality of your workouts will be affected by many variables like nutrition, amount of sleep, outside stress, etc. Even if you did one set of 6 chin-ups followed by two more sets of 5, you’ve bested your personal record. And how would you know that? Because you were keeping track!

I have detailed workout journals that span years. Not only do I note the sets, reps, time, etc. but also any other notes that would have come into play (e.g., “gym crowded – forced me to substitute Exercise X for Exercise Y; poor sleep the night before; feeling nauseous). This helps you to put some context around your performance. Your solution does not need to be fancy – a notebook is fine, though there are software packages you can use. No matter what you choose, make sure you utilize it every time you work out!

Stay Tuned for Part 2

Get Strong! Stay Strong!

Chris

Barbell Russian Twist  Alt. 20-30 reps    9296 

                Pivot Feet!

 

Kettlebell Swings   20-30 Reps                martonekbsbasics1russian-th1

            Watch your Toes!  Shoes???

 

Box Jumps    20 reps                                           img_0489preview

 

Physioball Plank to Push Up   20 reps       core-abdominal-and-lower-back-exercises-26 <———->   physiopushajpg_00000004727

Complete 3- 5 rounds.   Rest 1-3 min. between rounds (or longer as needed)

Get Strong! Stay Strong!  (Have Fun!)

Chris