Posts Tagged ‘sport specific exercise’

Santa is not the only one to use a sled!  The weighted sled can be used in rehab for lower extremity strength, endurance and makes a great core activator. Every patient suffering a significant injury to the lower extremity needs to restore integrated movement, strength, endurance and power. With the sled fastened around the waist and the sled towed behind leg drive and posterior chain strength can be developed for gait and transition into running. It simulates walking up hill without the hill. In addition it will get that heart rate jacked in a hurry!  Walking backward will really fire up the quads.  Now to use the sled for core strength and activation, I just put handles on the ends of the ropes where the waist band attaches. We can now repeat our walks holding the arms chest level or outstretched in front.


 

 

 

The resistance is now pulling back through the arms that have to be stabilized by the core as your legs are still driving forward, not to mention an even greater metabolic demand!  Walking forward activates more of the abdominals and walking backwards (holding the handles) will activate more of the posterior core muscles.  It also give you some additional bonus shoulder and arm work.  A shoulder harness is a great alternative to the handles although not as demanding.

 

 

 

 

I am a big fan of asymmetrical loading due to the increased demand for stability and its relation to “real life” activity/movement.  So, here are just a few of many tweaks to the sled I use.

                  

 

 

 

1 arm push                                     1 arm pull                        over shld pull

So, as you can see (hopefully)  these exercises can be used in rehab for the upper extremity, core or lower extremity.

Get Strong! Stay Strong!

Chris

Her is a great post from my good friend Adam Brush, top trainer at the Institute for Human Performance and Five Tool Baseball.

There’s no doubt that the core/trunk of a baseball player takes on a fair amount of rotational stress when it comes to on-field movements such as throwing, hitting, running.

To train for the rotational demands placed on the core we’ll structure Superset combinations, in which core integration is a major part of each exercise. The following PUSH/PULL combination is one such superset combination capable of developing the necessary core stiffness & strength a ball player will need to perform those on-field rotational movements.

SUPERSET

1-ARM(1A) DUMBBELL(DB) FLAT BENCH PRESS:
In addition to the strength development for the chest and triceps, proper execution and control of this unilateral movement will have a great influence on shoulder stability and core stiffness.

 

 

 

 

 

1-ARM, STAGGERED STANCE (S/S) CABLE ROW:
In addition to strength development for the back, posterior shoulder & biceps, this exercise is driven thru the extremely important transverse plane. In addition, the hip flexor of the rear leg is lengthened when the same side glutes are activated. This lengthening of the hip flexor becomes of great importance to hamstrings.

 

 
In addition, a similar 1A superset combination can be performed by implementing a 1A Incline DB press followed by a 1A “high to low” cable row
Stay tuned for a future blog that outlines a PULL/PUSH rotational superset combination.

Out train the game!

Posted by AB at 5:40 PM

By Charles Staley

There’s a very eloquent formula for determining success in any sporting endeavor:

Productivity = Potential — Losses Due to Faulty Process

As an athlete, there’s nothing you can do about your genetic inheritance, but there’s always room for improvement when it comes to your training methods. Particularly, it’s important to identify and correct the most significant error you’re making, because resolving this error has the most potential to improve your athletic performance.

Golfers are a strength coach’s dream, because few of them utilize resistance training. In such cases, a carefully supervised 8-10 week strength training program frequently results in well over a 100 percent strength increase. This increase creates a strength “reserve,” which quickly improves both power, accuracy, and endurance.

During a golf swing, it takes a certain amount of muscular strength to overcome the external resistance of the golf club (this strength is provided primarily by the legs, hips, and rotator muscles of the torso). The stronger you are, the more strength that is left in reserve, and the more you’ll be able to accelerate the club, swing after swing, without exhausting yourself over 18 holes.

For novice golfers, skill practice sessions are sufficient for developing sportspecific strength. But as technical ability improves, the need for supplementary strength training increases accordingly. One interesting phenomenon in golf is that younger players ignore the conditioning element of their preparation, but it often takes years, even decades to develop technical proficiency. So, a golfer may be well over 40 years old by the time he or she has developed a high level of technical expertise, but by this time, physical conditioning has become an issue.


Resistance Training Technology on a Scale of “Good, Better, Best”

While health clubs and equipment manufacturers will tell you otherwise, resistance training machines are not the “best” form of strength training technology, especially for golfers. While they definitely have their place, machines tend to restrict movement to a single plane, which means that the strength developed will not transfer well to an activity like golf, which is multiplanar. Machines also use “variable resistance” technology, so that the machine supposedly matches the muscle’s force curve. But most credible research casts doubts on the effectiveness of this concept. Finally, machines normally restrict the movement to a single joint for the purpose of “isolating” the muscle being worked, but golf is not an activity which requires isolated movements! The object of strength training for golf is to train movement, not muscles.

While “constant resistance” devices such as barbells and dumbbells are superior to machines, they nonetheless have their disadvantages as well. Let’s use the bench press as an example: you lower the bar to your chest, and then ram it to arms length. You assume you’re moving explosively, but as your arms reach extension, the antagonists (latissimus, biceps, rhomboids, and medial trapezious) begin to contract in an effort to decelerate the bar before it leaves your hands. It’s simply a protective mechanism.

Contrast this with your objective, which is to accelerate the bar, and you begin to see the problem. There are ways to address this inherent disadvantage of constant and variable resistance training, however.


Strengthening the Stabilizers

Stabilizers are muscles which anchor or immobilize one part of the body, allowing another part (usually the limbs) to exert force. The most significant stabilizers are those of the trunk— the abdominals and trunk extensors. If the motor cortex detects that it can’t stabilize the force provided by the prime movers, it simply won’t allow the prime movers to contract with full force. Stabilizers are best strengthened through exercises conducted in an unstable environment, such as on a “physio-ball” (those heavy-duty “beach balls” you might have noticed in your local health club), or movements performed with medicine balls.

If you’ve never seriously considered adopting a serious strength training program to improve your golf game, perhaps it’s time to reconsider. Don’t let stereotypical notions of strength training prevent you from taking advantage of this important conditioning element!


SIDEBAR: Strength Training Suggestions for Golfers

1) Seek professional guidance from a sports conditioning professional. Certified personal trainers who have significant experience working with athletes may also be a good option.

2) Initially, expect a slight decline in your game as your body begins to adapt to the additional training loads. After a handful of weeks, your game should climb back up to, and surpass previous levels. For this reason, don’t start a strength training program for the first time if you have important tournaments pending.

3) Expect to spend between 1 and 3 hours a week on your strength training program. The emphasis should be on leg and abdominal musculature.

Get Strong! Stay Strong!

Chris

DSCN4436

My good friend Adam wrote this on his site:  fivetoolbaseball.blogspot.com.
Even though the article is written for baseball the principles are applicable to any activity and to life in general!
As many baseball purists are aware, baseball players are evaluated utilizing the measuring stick known as the five tools: hitting for average, hitting for power, running speed, arm strength, defensive skills. Complimentary to these five tools, are a series of 5 training protocols collectively known as ‘Training to the 5th Power’ (T5). Based upon the explosive and power nature of baseball, I believe that by following the five training protocols will transfer off-field training to on-field performance.

THE PROTOCOLS ARE:
(1) Train standing;Training from standing positions trains the movements unique to baseball along with the respective muscle groups. Baseball players rarely rely on strength from sitting or lying down positions;yet exercises performed from such positions continue to dominate training programs. Utilizing modalities such as bands/cables from standing positions can target the same muscle groups typically trained from sitting or lying positions all the while training movements beneficial to baseball.

(2) Train with free weights; Free weights allow for multiple ranges of motion and multiple planes of motion(movement). Training with free weights, such as dumbells, allows for a bit more freedom of movment, unilateral training which can identify muscular imbalances between limbs,and builds neuromuscular efficiency (coordination of muscle groups). In addition, training with other free weight objects, such as medicine balls, provides power development. The ability to toss a free weight, such as a medicine ball, in a manner similar to hitting increases power potential of the muscles involved; making free weight objects superior to machines in replicating and increasing power.

(3) Train multi-joints – a.k.a compound movements; Movements involving more than one joint are referred to as compound movements. Multiple joint training allows for greater loads to be trained, therefore greater muscle recruitment, leading to greater strength development. I cant think of any movement in baseball that doenst involve the total body. Thus compound movements can deliver fluidity for on field performance…more so than single joint movements. In addition if your athlete needs to drop a few pounds then multi-joint, baseball specific movements can assist with increasing caloric expenditure.

(4)Train explosively; Slow and controlled movements are great for developing a certain level of strength. However, most baseball movements, even though strength based, are just as dependent on speed and power.Power can be defined as: POWER = WORK / TIME or POWER = FORCE x SPEED

Notice how power is dependent on speed. And the speed component explains the importance of explosive training for developing on-field, optimal baseball power.

(5) Functional Training (FT);Functional training is based upon training movements and not body parts. FT trains multiple planes of motions, in unstable environments, at baseball specific speeds. Basically, FT is “train like you play”. Functional Training supports the other T5 principles: Training in a standing position is functional for on-field activities; Training with free weights allows functional training along any plane and at any speed; Multiple joint, compound movement training is the way baseball is played, therefore functional. Much of how baseball is performed is power dominated, so training explosively becomes functional.

All in all implementing the T5 training guidelines are ideal for building overall baseball performance. However, like other training concepts,thereare exceptions in exchange for other effective results. For example, slow, isolated work in stable positions (i.e. lying down,) just might be necessary for the athlete needing a bit more muscle (hypertrophy). Take special note that although bodybuilders look great, I dont recommend an all exclusive use of bodybuilding methodologies for improving on field, baseball performance. The question which would you rather train for “all go” or “all show”?

Regardless of the type of training incorporated into your program, the majority should fall within T5.

As Adam always says:  Go hard in the yard!

Get Strong! Stay Strong!

Chris

Exercise to improve your baseball and golf swing, tennis stroke, and hockey slap shot. —Mens Health Magazine

A powerful rotational turn will give you an extra 10 yards off the tee or 10 mph on your fastball. Exercises to boost that strength are overlooked but important. “Most sports require stabilization, strength, and power through some type of rotation,” says Tyler Wallace, NASM-C.P.T., of the National Academy of Sports Medicine. Here are the exercises Wallace recommends for powering up some key sports moves.

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Baseball Swing    Standing cable rotation.     Stand between the weight stacks of a cable station. Grab both ends of a rope handle attached to the midlevel pulley. Keeping your elbows bent, rotate your body to the left. Pause, then return to the starting position. Do three sets of 10 reps on each side.

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Baseball Pitch     Medicine-ball lift.     Lift a medicine ball from your chest to above your shoulder, rotating your hips and pivoting your back foot as you go. Pause when your arms are straight, then lower the ball. Do three sets of 10 reps on both sides.

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Golf Swing          Swiss-ball Russian twist.    Lie with your shoulder blades and head on a Swiss ball and your feet flat on the floor. Hold your arms straight above you and clasp your hands together. Slowly rotate your shoulders to the left until your arms are roughly parallel to the floor. Pause, then rotate to the right. Do two sets of 15 repetitions.

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Tennis Stroke    Standing medicine-ball rotation chop.     Hold a medicine ball overhead with your arms straight. Keeping them straight, swing your arms down as if to throw the ball to the outside of each foot. Do four sets of eight repetitions on each side.

images            images_5     (couldnt find pic of someone doing this laying on swiss ball)

Hockey Slap Shot    Single-arm Swiss-ball rotation row.    Grab a dumbbell and lie facedown on a Swiss ball. With the weight in your right hand, let your right arm hang down. Place your other hand on your hip. Pull the weight up toward your chest as you rotate your upper body to the right. Pause, then slowly return to the starting position. Do two sets of 15 with each arm.

Great examples of matching an exercise to a specific activity to improve performance!  The same can be done for almost any activity.  Be creative and break out of the body building mentality!

Get Strong! Stay Strong!

Chris