Posts Tagged ‘rehabilitation’

Have you been to the new site???  Its pretty cool and packed full of great content.  Check it out at http://www.sportsmedandfitnessfanatic.blogspot.com.

Santa is not the only one to use a sled!  The weighted sled can be used in rehab for lower extremity strength, endurance and makes a great core activator. Every patient suffering a significant injury to the lower extremity needs to restore integrated movement, strength, endurance and power. With the sled fastened around the waist and the sled towed behind leg drive and posterior chain strength can be developed for gait and transition into running. It simulates walking up hill without the hill. In addition it will get that heart rate jacked in a hurry!  Walking backward will really fire up the quads.  Now to use the sled for core strength and activation, I just put handles on the ends of the ropes where the waist band attaches. We can now repeat our walks holding the arms chest level or outstretched in front.


 

 

 

The resistance is now pulling back through the arms that have to be stabilized by the core as your legs are still driving forward, not to mention an even greater metabolic demand!  Walking forward activates more of the abdominals and walking backwards (holding the handles) will activate more of the posterior core muscles.  It also give you some additional bonus shoulder and arm work.  A shoulder harness is a great alternative to the handles although not as demanding.

 

 

 

 

I am a big fan of asymmetrical loading due to the increased demand for stability and its relation to “real life” activity/movement.  So, here are just a few of many tweaks to the sled I use.

                  

 

 

 

1 arm push                                     1 arm pull                        over shld pull

So, as you can see (hopefully)  these exercises can be used in rehab for the upper extremity, core or lower extremity.

Get Strong! Stay Strong!

Chris

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I often talk to people that ask about nutrition. One of the first things they ask me is what do I eat and how much do I eat? They are often surprised when I tell them I eat 5-6 times per day. Many people especially those trying to lose weight have a hard time with this concept.  It is still common for people to think they need to severely calories, which is true but they often go overboard with this concept.  I will often explain that our bodies are built for survival based on DNA that is millions of years old.  That is why it is hard to lose weight and also to gain (build muscle).  I further explain that the body is smart.  If it believes you are not going to give it adequate calories/nutrition it will store (hold onto) the fat for its energy.  By eating enough calories throughout the day your body will recognize this and “release” the fat.  One of the main reasons eating multiple meals is important is that it regulates the insulin response which influences fat and protein metabolism and helps maintain energy levels evenly throughout the day.  By skipping meals you tend to be hungrier when you do eat and over eat which leads to that food coma feeling and fat accumulation.  Another important factor in eating regularly throughout the day is that if you do not “feed” your body appropriately then the body will take the needed nutrients from your bones, lean muscle mass and other tissues possibly contributing to osteoporosis and loss of lean muscle mass.  It doesn’t have to be over-whelming.  Three nutritious meals and 2-3 healthy snacks is it!  Of course eating the right type of foods like lean proteins, low glycemic carbs and “good” fats need to be coupled with a good exercise program for optimal health.

Get Strong! Stay Strong!

Chris

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If there’s one thing we guys like it is benching!  Unfortunately our shoulders suffer sometime or another.  Talk to any powerlifter or body builder and a majority will tell you of their shoulder problems.  Bench pressing is not kind to the shoulder.  In the lowered position, the shoulder joint capsule is stretched and the subacromial space is compromised setting us up for impingement, capsular instability, A/C joint and glenohumeral wear and tear and muscle and ligament strains.  One solution to protect the shoulder and resume benching after a shoulder injury, is to bench off the floor instead of the bench.  This prevents the elbows from dropping below the trunk saving the joint a whole lot of stress and strain.  And, you can actually bench more weight, which activates more fibers and ultimately leads to increased strength and size of the chest!  By benching from the floor you do not hit the “sticking point”, which is the weakest part of the chest press movement and the limiting factor to weight lifted.  Thereby protecting the shoulder and increasing your bench!  What guy is not going to be happy about that!  So, ladies please dont tell us guys we cant bench.  We have to! (it must be genetic), regardless of how skinny our legs are.  We love to bench!

Hopefully now you have a plan to protect the injured shoulder and begin the inured lifter back to benching and being happy.
Get Strong! Stay Strong!
Chris

Actually, it is the one you consume right after your workout. After your work out your muscles are most sensitive to insulin.  Insulin is what causes your muscle to take up glucose from the blood storing it as glycogen.  Glycogen is the fuel that your muscles use.  So, consuming adequate carbs and protein after your workout allows you to recover faster which means your body is better prepared for the next workout.  I often discuss this with patients due to the fact they are working their buts off in therapy (at least in my world of sports physical therapy they do) so recovery is important and their body is trying to heal itself therefore adequate nutrition enhances this process, not to mention proper hydration which most people lack.  Even if you are not an athlete, recovering appropriately can mean a better day at work or playing with the kids later or the next day.  By consuming protein after a workout you can enhance glycogen replenishment by 30% and if you consume carbs with that you can double the insulin response which means more nutrients are able to be delivered back to the musles.  Generally speaking, you should consume a carb to protein ratio of about 2-3:1.  If you are doing longer duration endurance type exercise then a higher dose of carbs (4:1 ratio) is more appropriate.  Optimally this should be consumed within about 20 minutes after exercise but technically there is a two hour window post exercise.  Whey protein is the best choice because it is absorbed faster and the carbs should be simple sugar.  A cheap and easy mix is to purchase whey protein and mix it with generic kool-aide.  Mix and match your flavors to your taste preference.  Again generally speaking, a ratio of about 40 g carbs (sugar) and 15g protein would work.  Dosage can vary based on training intensity and goals, but that at least gives a geral framework and rationale s to why it is critical to get you post work out supplementation in.  So dont forget this critical piece to your rehab or training process!

Get Strong! Stay Strong!

Chris

Great Info from the Gray Institute Newsletter

TWEAKOLOGY is the transformation of the notion (what we know about function) into the motion (what function looks like).  Knowing that every “tweak” will create a different reaction, mindfully chosen “tweaks” provide the foundation of the exercise strategies that are specific for each individual.

This month we highlight the BALANCE REACH as our exercise and use SPEED as our “tweak”.  Before we further describe the exercise, let’s discuss balance in general.  Balance is a state of equilibrium, it is dynamic in nature, it requires a combination of stability and mobility or “Mostability”.  Balance does NOT require stillness and is hampered by rigidity.

Back to the task at hand…SINGLE LEG BALANCE REACH.  Two things to look for when observing this exercise are: 1) how far the individual can reach their and 2) the ability to transform the direction of the movement.  Let’s perform three different foot reaches at ground level using the three cardinal planes 1) Sagittal Plane (click HERE to view) 2) Frontal Plane (click HERE to view) 3) Transverse Plane (click HERE to view).  Perform 3-5 repetitions with each foot at a self-selected speed.  Observe not only the reaching foot and leg, but observe the “balance” leg.  Also observe the reaction of the trunk, the shoulders and even the head and hands.  Does each side react the same?  Is there similar control demonstrated?  Similar ranges of motion throughout the body?   Similar quality of movement through the Chain Reaction™?  Now let’s tweak it.  Repeat the balance reaches with decreased speed.  How does decreasing the speed affect control, range of motion, and quality of movement?  If the body senses a loss of stability and control, with the simple tweak of increased or decreased speed it will react with an immediate neurological stiffening to add control back into our system – to prevent one from falling.  Remember, it is always about preserving ourselves within our environment.  As you experience a stiffening effect, do not worry – but note the difference between fluidity in motion versus rigidity.

Find the speed of your success.  Also find the speed of success for those that you are assessing, training and rehabilitating.   Depending upon the function that they are looking to improve, condition the movement with slightly decreased speeds and slightly increased speeds, over time without sacrificing fluid efficient movement.

As always, safety is the number one concern.  Any time you believe you are not able to complete the movement without the need for additional stability, make sure that you are performing the balance foot reaches in a doorway, next to a wall, or next to a chair or even having someone else control you through hand stability.  Remember to provide the same safety net and opportunities for your patients and clients.