Posts Tagged ‘fitness’

Have you been to the new site???  Its pretty cool and packed full of great content.  Check it out at http://www.sportsmedandfitnessfanatic.blogspot.com.

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Just a reminder to check out new post @ http://www.sportsmedandfitnessfanatic.blogspot.com.

Ill be doing all my posting on the new site.  Head over and click to follow.  Many exciting things coming!

Thanks for your interest!!!!!

Get Strong! Stay Strong!

Chris

Hey Gang just a note to click over and subscribe/follow/bookmark my new blog  www.sportsmedandfitnessfanatic.blogspot.com

Same great content, just a new platform.

 

See you there!

 

Get Strong! Stay Strong!

Chris


Feeling very good. 2 days and can add the chicken and fish into the mix. Started green food supplements today which are a great source of vitamins, minerals antioxidants and actually protein. Still knocking down the fruits and veggies only w/ 3 SP Complete shakes per day and plenty of water.
Im in the groove now! Getting creative w/ my fruits and veggies. Blender and frozen fruit for smoothies at work is awesome!
Still loving the sweet potatoes w/ 1/2 cup brown rice and some cinnamon as my staple. Put together artichoke hearts, red onion, blk olives and red peppers w/ a bit of balsalmic vinegarette as tasty dish.
Todays workout consisted of :
Superset : 1.) DB clean to overhead press 8x each arm w/ squat thrust jump pull ups x 10 for 3 sets
2.) Barbel forward press alt x 20 w/ Single leg deadlift w/ 2 KB 10x each leg for 3 sets
Finished off w/ couple sets standing calve raises and called it a day
Followed that off w/ monster smoothie w/ protein, frozen fruit and cleanse powder then hit the showers.
Had great energy today w/ workout
Energy throughout purificaton has been very high. Maintaining weight give or take a pound or two.


I must say, it is going much better than I anticipated. Energy is good and not really missing (physically) the caffeine as I thought I would. Ive only really lost 1 lb which is good b/c im not doing this to lose weight. But co-worker also doing purification w/ me has lost 6 feraking lbs already and he feels great too! (he does want to lose some weight)
Had great work out at 6:30 am.
Triplexed: diagonal stance cable chest press, bent row and leg press for 3 sets. Then, close grip bench, lunge walk and barbell russian twists. Finished off w/ barbell reverse curls and 1 arm cable press downs.
Todays food consisted of post workout monster fruit smoothie w/ protein and cleanse powder. 1 apple, 1 banana, bowl of beets and sauerkraut (yum), bowl brown rice w/ hot sauce, 2nd fruit smoothie w/ protein and cleanse powder, 1 cup baby carrots. Out to eat for dinner…all you can eat salad bar (2 trips) w/ sides of spaghetti squash, grilled zuchinni and baked potato. Oh yeah I killed it!
Drank H20 all day and night.
Now I am gioing to bed to dream about chicken wings and cheez its!
Get Strong! Stay Strong!
Chris

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If there’s one thing we guys like it is benching!  Unfortunately our shoulders suffer sometime or another.  Talk to any powerlifter or body builder and a majority will tell you of their shoulder problems.  Bench pressing is not kind to the shoulder.  In the lowered position, the shoulder joint capsule is stretched and the subacromial space is compromised setting us up for impingement, capsular instability, A/C joint and glenohumeral wear and tear and muscle and ligament strains.  One solution to protect the shoulder and resume benching after a shoulder injury, is to bench off the floor instead of the bench.  This prevents the elbows from dropping below the trunk saving the joint a whole lot of stress and strain.  And, you can actually bench more weight, which activates more fibers and ultimately leads to increased strength and size of the chest!  By benching from the floor you do not hit the “sticking point”, which is the weakest part of the chest press movement and the limiting factor to weight lifted.  Thereby protecting the shoulder and increasing your bench!  What guy is not going to be happy about that!  So, ladies please dont tell us guys we cant bench.  We have to! (it must be genetic), regardless of how skinny our legs are.  We love to bench!

Hopefully now you have a plan to protect the injured shoulder and begin the inured lifter back to benching and being happy.
Get Strong! Stay Strong!
Chris

By  Charles Staley

Twenty years ago, strength training was considered taboo for martial artists.

Today, it is gaining in popularity, despite the fact that it is rarely carried out in a rational manner. Due to strong influences from the world of bodybuilding, most martial artists are only getting half the potential benefit that strength training has to offer.

Specificity and Strength Training

Virtually all martial arts depend upon the ability to develop force very rapidly. Technically, the rapid execution of a technique results in more damage to the target. Tactically, rapidly executed techniques have a greater chance of landing, since they are more difficult to defend against than slower movements. From a defensive point of view, rapidly performed blocks and parries, as well as defensive footwork, are made more effective if executed rapidly.

Strength training for sports normally progresses through three phases: hypertrophy (muscle mass), absolute strength (the most force that can be produced irregardless of time required), and finally, speed strength (the ability to develop force rapidly). In the case of the martial arts, most athletes spend most or all of their time developing hypertrophy. A few progress to methods designed to develop absolute strength. Fewer still venture into speed-strength territory.

Critical to this article is the concept that the ability to develop high levels of force (such as displayed during a 400 pound bench press) is not as important as the ability to develop a high level of force within a very short (less than a second) period of time. The development of muscle mass and absolute strength are important because they form the foundation for speed-strength, but by themselves, they are next to worthless.

Hypertrophy Training

Sometimes called “the bodybuilding method,” hypertrophy training involves the use of moderate (between 70 and 85 percent of maximum) loads for sets of between 5 and 10 repetitions. Such loads provoke an increase in protein synthesis within the muscle cells, leading to an enlargement of the existing muscle tissue.

This enlargement is the first step in developing speedstrength, since increases in muscle cross-section are highly correlated to increases in absolute strength. An athlete stays in the hypertrophy phase for as long as is necessary and/or appropriate— while hypertrophy is a necessary first step, too much of it can be counter-productive (i.e., growing out of your weight class, or developing flexibility deficits, etc.). When the desired level of hypertrophy is developed, the athlete moves on to absolute strength training methods. Note: Athletes should increase protein intake while in this phase to help the body resynthesize muscle tissue.

Training for Absolute Strength

Absolute strength is developed through the use of high (85+ percent of maximum) loads. Repetitions range from 1 to 4. Such training improves neurological efficiency, or the ability to recruit higher percentages of existing muscle fibers. Fast twitch muscle is preferentially recruited over slow twitch fibers at this intensity range. The development of absolute strength is considered to be a prerequisite to speed-strength, but this training method should only be attempted by mature, experienced athletes, due to the high loads involved.

Developing Speed-strength: Moving the Time-force Curve to the Left

Once absolute strength is brought to a high level, the next task is to move the force time curve over to the left. Several methods can be used for this purpose: plyometrics, the use of modified Olympic lifts, and the lifting of submaximal (70 to 80 percent of maximum) weights at a high rate of speed. The emphasis is on improving the rate of force development (R.O.F.D.).

During the period of time devoted to speed-strength work, one can expect gains in hypertrophy and absolute strength to degrade to a certain degree. For this reason, a rationally designed training program will constantly alternate between phases devoted to hypertrophy, absolute strength, and speedstrength, in that order.

For mature athletes who already have sufficient muscle mass, the hypertrophy phase will be greatly abbreviated, however. For competitive martial artists, training cycles are planned so that the speedstrength phase coincides with the competitive season. In this way, sport-specific strength is brought to a peak when it is needed most.

Strength as a Means to an End

I caution the reader to remember that strength, as a component of physical preparation, is not an end but a means to an end. It simply allows the martial artist to achieve high results on the technical and tactical levels of preparation, and thus, to a high level of psychological preparedness.

Get Strong! Stay Strong!

Chris

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By Nick Nilsson
Author: Fitness-eBooks
Creator: Powerful Training Secrets

This tip is a bit of a change of pace… no pictures…no video (this one would be tough to show in a picture or video but is pretty easy to explain).

If you’re looking to really build your calves, this one little piece of advice will help TREMENDOUSLY. Yet you rarely, if ever, see anybody mention this when you get instructions on calf exercises.

So what is this advice? It’s a simple thing…when you do a calf raise exercise and you’re coming to the top of the movement, be sure to COME UP ON THE BIG TOE KNUCKLES (on the bottoms of your feet, of course).

This activates the gastrocnemius (calf muscles) muscle bellies strongly. The difference contraction and fiber activation will surprise you!

Next time you do calf raises, don’t use this technique and just do them as you regularly do them. Notice how your feet move as you come up. Chances are, as you do the calf raise, your feet roll to the OUTSIDE.

This is typical because this is the path of least resistance for the biomechanics of your calves. If you look at how your feet are shaped, the big toe is longest and furthest up. As you move towards the outside of your feet, your toe knuckles slope “downwards”. Naturally, your feet will roll to this side unless you force them not to.

This doesn’t need a picture because you can look down at your own foot and see this sloping!

I want you to stand up and try this right now doing just a bodyweight calf raise on both feet just on the floor – you’ll feel the difference.

When you’re doing the regular calf raise, the body naturally wants to follow that path of least resistance and will roll towards the outside. Do a few reps of this, just letting your body take the natural path when doing the calf raise. Look down at your feet as you do it – you’ll see even though your toes are all pointing straight forward, the downward slope of your toe knuckles make your ankles roll out to the sides.

Granted, you can still get a LOT of tension on the calves even when you roll out like this. And you can build good calves this way.

Now to use the big toe technique. (when you use this in training, lighten the weight up so you get the form exactly right). Now, when you come up, try to put ALL the pressure on the big toe knuckles of your feet and push down hard with the big toes.

Your goal here is to try and put as much tension as possible on the big toes rather than letting your feet roll out to the outside as is the tendency. In fact, I want you to place NO tension on the rest of your toe knuckles other than those big toes as you come!

Come up and squeeze hard. Feel the difference? MAJOR contraction in the calves. Now imagine adding weight to this technique!

This is the secret to getting those beautiful, just UGLY looking calves that really stand out and mark you as a serious trainer! I don’t know about you, but my goal with my calves has always been to have regular “non-training” people go “eww” when they see them. 🙂 That’s when I’ll know I’ve reached my goal.

Honestly, this big toe thing is one of the reasons ballet dancers get such great calves. They dance on point, which is basically on the big toes. The other toe knuckles don’t play as big a role.

So give this technique a try in your next calf workout. Lighten the weight and come up on your big toe knuckles. It’ll make a BIG difference!

Get Strong! Stay Strong! (and get rid of those chicken legs! Ha Ha)

Chris

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Actual Question: Is it OK for 8 – 10 year old kids to participate in Triathlons?

Reply from Brian Grasso (Founder and CEO of International Youth Conditioning Assoc.)

While I am 100% heartened by virtually any activity a young person chooses to engage in, it is important to be careful how we direct their efforts in terms of “developmentally-sound” parameters.

The essence and need of childhood play (or fitness – they are interchangeable terms) is self-exploration of movement. This movement must be in the style of “free play”. Meaning simply, kids must be encouraged to move in a variety of fashions (run, climb, crawl, jump, hop etc) without the over-prescription or repetitiveness of specific movements.

This is an imperative part of neural growth and development, setting the seeds for both a future full of movement and athletic ability as well as injury avoidance. Much like the academic world, the early years of school is based on learning a variety of subjects in order to create a well-rounded brain. Specification occurs later in life once this broad base has been built.

While triathlons involve three separate movement functions, they are still rather myopic in nature and will become repetitive during training phases. One only needs to look at the tremendous number of injuries that adult tri athletes endure (mostly in the realm of chronic injuries resulting from REPETATIVE action) to see what this type of training and over-indulgence of competition has the potential to do to younger people.

In short…

Repetitive motion of any kind is developmentally limiting for kids and could easily lead to overuse injury.

Free play and freedom of motion are the core necessities of fitness for kids.

Enough is enough.

It’s time for our industry to get educated and start creating youth fitness
and sport training programs that both WORK and are DEVELOPMENTALLY APPROPRIATE.

In my humble opinion….its a stupid idea! Short and simple.  If you want more explanation as to why check out the IYCA

Get Strong! Stay Strong! (and for goodness sakes be smart with our children!!!!!)

Chris