Posts Tagged ‘exercise’


Feeling very good. 2 days and can add the chicken and fish into the mix. Started green food supplements today which are a great source of vitamins, minerals antioxidants and actually protein. Still knocking down the fruits and veggies only w/ 3 SP Complete shakes per day and plenty of water.
Im in the groove now! Getting creative w/ my fruits and veggies. Blender and frozen fruit for smoothies at work is awesome!
Still loving the sweet potatoes w/ 1/2 cup brown rice and some cinnamon as my staple. Put together artichoke hearts, red onion, blk olives and red peppers w/ a bit of balsalmic vinegarette as tasty dish.
Todays workout consisted of :
Superset : 1.) DB clean to overhead press 8x each arm w/ squat thrust jump pull ups x 10 for 3 sets
2.) Barbel forward press alt x 20 w/ Single leg deadlift w/ 2 KB 10x each leg for 3 sets
Finished off w/ couple sets standing calve raises and called it a day
Followed that off w/ monster smoothie w/ protein, frozen fruit and cleanse powder then hit the showers.
Had great energy today w/ workout
Energy throughout purificaton has been very high. Maintaining weight give or take a pound or two.


I must say, it is going much better than I anticipated. Energy is good and not really missing (physically) the caffeine as I thought I would. Ive only really lost 1 lb which is good b/c im not doing this to lose weight. But co-worker also doing purification w/ me has lost 6 feraking lbs already and he feels great too! (he does want to lose some weight)
Had great work out at 6:30 am.
Triplexed: diagonal stance cable chest press, bent row and leg press for 3 sets. Then, close grip bench, lunge walk and barbell russian twists. Finished off w/ barbell reverse curls and 1 arm cable press downs.
Todays food consisted of post workout monster fruit smoothie w/ protein and cleanse powder. 1 apple, 1 banana, bowl of beets and sauerkraut (yum), bowl brown rice w/ hot sauce, 2nd fruit smoothie w/ protein and cleanse powder, 1 cup baby carrots. Out to eat for dinner…all you can eat salad bar (2 trips) w/ sides of spaghetti squash, grilled zuchinni and baked potato. Oh yeah I killed it!
Drank H20 all day and night.
Now I am gioing to bed to dream about chicken wings and cheez its!
Get Strong! Stay Strong!
Chris

Her is a great post from my good friend Adam Brush, top trainer at the Institute for Human Performance and Five Tool Baseball.

There’s no doubt that the core/trunk of a baseball player takes on a fair amount of rotational stress when it comes to on-field movements such as throwing, hitting, running.

To train for the rotational demands placed on the core we’ll structure Superset combinations, in which core integration is a major part of each exercise. The following PUSH/PULL combination is one such superset combination capable of developing the necessary core stiffness & strength a ball player will need to perform those on-field rotational movements.

SUPERSET

1-ARM(1A) DUMBBELL(DB) FLAT BENCH PRESS:
In addition to the strength development for the chest and triceps, proper execution and control of this unilateral movement will have a great influence on shoulder stability and core stiffness.

 

 

 

 

 

1-ARM, STAGGERED STANCE (S/S) CABLE ROW:
In addition to strength development for the back, posterior shoulder & biceps, this exercise is driven thru the extremely important transverse plane. In addition, the hip flexor of the rear leg is lengthened when the same side glutes are activated. This lengthening of the hip flexor becomes of great importance to hamstrings.

 

 
In addition, a similar 1A superset combination can be performed by implementing a 1A Incline DB press followed by a 1A “high to low” cable row
Stay tuned for a future blog that outlines a PULL/PUSH rotational superset combination.

Out train the game!

Posted by AB at 5:40 PM

Great article I came across on Mike Mahlers website written by Sarah Cheatham

Nerve Glides mobilize and tension the nerves through a range of motion. Which can be thought of as joint mobility but for your nerves. Nerves are high-threat and thus high-priority for your CNS (central nervous system). This means that if something goes wrong with a nerve you know pretty quickly.

For example: Sciatica pain. The sciatica is a nerve that runs from your low back (lumbar plexus) down the back of your thigh, into your calf, and ends up in branches in your feet. You know when it has been compromised. Often the important nerve gets pinched from excessive compression via heavy squatting, bad lifting, poor rotation, a large gut, high heeled shoes, etc. Most often, the sciatica is pinched by lumbar stenosis. Lumbar stenosis is narrowing of the lumbar nerve canals and too often occurs because of shoe choice. Anything that elevates the heel forces everything up the chain to adjust.

So think about this: your heel is elevated (the point of initial impact of your body and the earth). To propel you forward, the energy transmits up to your knee, but with an elevated heel the knee is already pitched forward. In a barefoot step, the knee starts from extension, then flexes, then goes into full extension. In a heel-raised knee, the knee starts in flexion, goes to semi-extension (in other words: still in flexion) then finishes in flexion. There’s no good chance for the knee to go through its full range of motion. So you’re selling your mobility short here, at the first joint up from the ground. This means you have knee and low back pain…Your shoes are limiting your mobility and this is the reason you have knee and back pain. There is nothing wrong with your knee, it’s over-working because you chose some silly shoes.

We’ll move up to the pelvis from the knee and by-pass the hip for now. What happens in the pelvis with a raised-heel (because of your cute shoes …that were on sale)? The pelvis tilts forward. You see a great example of this in pregnant women and pot-bellied men. But it happens in your body when you wear high, or semi-high heels, Nike Shox (and the like) or even combat or cowboy boots. This means that lower belly you just can’t seem to get rid of with all those crunches is really a result of your shoes. When your pelvis tilts forward, all that is in it has to adjusts too. In other words, save for your skin & fascia, your guts would spill forward out of your low-belly. A graphic description, I know, but it proves a point. Are those shoes really that cute now? May I remind you they give you a belly “pooch,” the one ladies are forever complaining about not being able to get rid of despite countless “core” work. And it goes beyond high heels, to elevated heel tennis shoes.

With the pelvis pitched forward, the low back has an excessive curve in it: lordosis, technically. Meaning an exaggerated curvature of the low back. That curve is what’s putting the pinch on your sciatica, amongst other nerves that live in your low back. Remember, this is all because your heel is elevated up off the ground…even slightly. Our bodies are so smart, that they will adapt to a demand (walking in high heels or running in shox) without us asking. But you can see it comes at a price…and it’s all your fault.

What’s the significance of poor shoe choice, joint mobility, and what can you do to help yourself?

Often smaller branches of the sciatica down in the feet go unused and can even of die off due to the stenosis caused by poor shoe choice and the resulting poor posture and gait. This, in addition to chronic low back pain and decreased training performance. If you don’t mobilize the joints the nerves feed through, (in this case the lumbar & hip joints for the sciatica), we get disuses injuries (see: sprained and twisted ankles, muscular atrophy, weakness and imbalances). The answer to getting the most out of your body for a lifetime: Specific joint mobility and flat-soled shoes regardless of your chosen activity.

Specific joint mobility done with intention will gently mobilize the nerves that feed through the joints and therby significantly enhance your brain/body coordination!

Get Strong! Stay Strong!
Chris

Despite their name, the adductor muscles work primarily as strong sagittal plane hip flexor or extensors. For example, if you are walking (or running) and the right leg is forward, the right adductor works as an extensor and the left as a flexor and then they switch as you alternate legs in the cycle. Have you ever went out and ran or sprinted for the first time? Where did you feel sore? Right, in the groin and inner thighs (as well as the rest of your body if was your first time).
The adductors (generally) attach proximally to the pubic bone and distally attach to the posterior medial aspect of the femur, giving them their mechanical advantage in the sagittal plane. In single leg stance or the single leg phase of gait running or kicking they work with the gluteus medius and the quadratus lumborum to stabilize the pelvis and limb in the frontal plane on the stance side. Now, in activities such as gymnastics, ballet, and karate where the leg is lifted or rapidly “thrown” out to the side the adductors will actually adduct the leg to bring it back into position to hit the ground.

Due to its atachment to the pubic bone, the adductors when activated, can stimulate (turn on) the pelvic floor muscles.  So, squeezing something between the legs while doing a bridge or squat for example can increase pelvic floor activity, which is important for women who have had multiple childbirths and people with core stabilization issues.

Some examples of functional exercises that activate the adductors include:  lunges – forward, lateral and posterior lateral w/ rotation, step up w/ opp. leg hip flexion (w or w/out resistance from cuff or cable), single leg balance w/ opp. leg reaches, and resisted walk, jog or running (cable, bungie, sled).

Once you understand what the bones are doing in all 3 planes (against gravity, ground reaction forces and momentum) and you know where the muscle attaches proximally and distally, you can begin to figure out its true function and design exercises to actually improve the bodies abilitiy to move.  Unfortunately, school doesnt usually teach us that.  Think back to anatomy.  We are taught that the adductors adduct the leg.  Well, now we know that in function they rarely ever do that!  Good luck and have fun!  There is always more to learn!

Get Strong! Stay Strong!

Chris

Great Info from the Gray Institute Newsletter

TWEAKOLOGY is the transformation of the notion (what we know about function) into the motion (what function looks like).  Knowing that every “tweak” will create a different reaction, mindfully chosen “tweaks” provide the foundation of the exercise strategies that are specific for each individual.

This month we highlight the BALANCE REACH as our exercise and use SPEED as our “tweak”.  Before we further describe the exercise, let’s discuss balance in general.  Balance is a state of equilibrium, it is dynamic in nature, it requires a combination of stability and mobility or “Mostability”.  Balance does NOT require stillness and is hampered by rigidity.

Back to the task at hand…SINGLE LEG BALANCE REACH.  Two things to look for when observing this exercise are: 1) how far the individual can reach their and 2) the ability to transform the direction of the movement.  Let’s perform three different foot reaches at ground level using the three cardinal planes 1) Sagittal Plane (click HERE to view) 2) Frontal Plane (click HERE to view) 3) Transverse Plane (click HERE to view).  Perform 3-5 repetitions with each foot at a self-selected speed.  Observe not only the reaching foot and leg, but observe the “balance” leg.  Also observe the reaction of the trunk, the shoulders and even the head and hands.  Does each side react the same?  Is there similar control demonstrated?  Similar ranges of motion throughout the body?   Similar quality of movement through the Chain Reaction™?  Now let’s tweak it.  Repeat the balance reaches with decreased speed.  How does decreasing the speed affect control, range of motion, and quality of movement?  If the body senses a loss of stability and control, with the simple tweak of increased or decreased speed it will react with an immediate neurological stiffening to add control back into our system – to prevent one from falling.  Remember, it is always about preserving ourselves within our environment.  As you experience a stiffening effect, do not worry – but note the difference between fluidity in motion versus rigidity.

Find the speed of your success.  Also find the speed of success for those that you are assessing, training and rehabilitating.   Depending upon the function that they are looking to improve, condition the movement with slightly decreased speeds and slightly increased speeds, over time without sacrificing fluid efficient movement.

As always, safety is the number one concern.  Any time you believe you are not able to complete the movement without the need for additional stability, make sure that you are performing the balance foot reaches in a doorway, next to a wall, or next to a chair or even having someone else control you through hand stability.  Remember to provide the same safety net and opportunities for your patients and clients.

By Sylvia Anderson, IH Editor — Published: July 29, 2010

If shedding pounds isn’t enough motivation to get you out of the recliner and into the gym, here are 11 powerful reasons to finally get up and get moving. According to U.S. News & World Report exercise not only helps you lose weight, but can boost your brain functioning and your mood, too.  But that’s not all.
Exercise reverses the aging process.

Stress takes a toll on your ability on your ability to age gracefully. When you exercise the brain’s feel good chemicals – dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin – receive a much-needed boost to combat life’s stressors.

Exercise can lift the cloud of depression.

In some cases consistent activity can decrease the symptoms of depression about as well as prescription antidepressant drugs.

Exercise improves brainpower.

Exercise increases growth factors, certain brain chemicals that are fundamental in producing new brain cells.

New research from Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago explains further. Two proteins are involved. One is called bone–morphogenetic protein (BMP), which hinders the production of new brain cells. The other protein is called Noggin, which is a BMP antagonist. According to the New York Times, more Noggin in your brain means less BMP activity. The result is more production of new brain cells.

Exercise fosters more self-esteem.

If you’ve lead a basically sedentary life, even small accomplishments such as running (or walking) a mile will make you feel better about yourself and what you see when you look in the mirror.

Exercise is a natural high.

You’ve probably heard marathon runners talk of the “runner’s high.” It’s a natural feeling of euphoria you get from high intensity exercise.  And the best part?  There are no bad side effects associated with it.

Need even more reasons to exercise?

Regular exercise has been shown to keep your mind sharp and can keep dementia at bay – despite what mainstream medicine reports. Chances are a few decades from now you won’t be too concerned about how you look on the beach, but if you are committed to an exercise routine, your mental clarity and quick wit will testify to your determination instead.

Even if you get a late start, exercise will slow down the aging process. This means you’ll be much less likely to have to deal with a disability or chronic disease – and much more likely to be trim and fit, happy, and self-sufficient.

Exercise improves immunity
by circulating immune cells more efficiently throughout your blood. This makes it easier for your immune system to attack viruses and diseases.

Exercise stabilizes your insulin levels. This is crucial for warding off the onset of Type-2 diabetes, and a low sugar environment also decreases cancer cell growth.

Exercise decreases the incidence of colon cancer
by 50% when compared to sedentary behavior. In addition, women who stick to a consistent exercise regimen can reduce the risk of developing breast cancer by 20 to 30% when compared to her inactive counterparts.

Researchers have measured the biochemical changes that take place when exercising. It’s really amazing what happens. From burning fat calories to stabilizing blood sugar, exercising regularly and maintaining a healthy weight optimizes insulin receptor sensitivity.This is perhaps one of the most important factors when it comes to improving overall health and the prevention of all types of diseases–from diabetes to cardiac disease, to cancer.

In an age where Big Pharma pushes a pill for just about everything, the evidence is overwhelming – natural solutions such as exercise are a safer and often better remedy for many conditions and diseases.

Life is a Sport. Get Strong! Stay Strong!

Chris

From Dr Mercola.com

New research shows that a twice weekly hip strengthening regimen proved effective at reducing or eliminating the kind of knee pain referred to as patellofemoral pain (PFP) in female runners.  Stronger hips may correct running form errors that contribute to PFP.

The study used a pain scale of 0 to 10, with 3 representing the onset of pain and 7 representing very strong pain. The injured runners began the six-week trial registering pain of 7 when they ran on a treadmill, and finished the study period registering pain levels of 2 or lower.

According to Science Daily:

“PFP, one of the most common running injuries, is caused when the thigh bone rubs against the back of the knee cap. Runners with PFP typically do not feel pain when they begin running, but once the pain begins, it gets increasingly worse … PFP essentially wears away cartilage and can have the same effect as osteoarthritis.”

Vigorous physical activity in young children results in stronger hip bones.

More than 200 six-year olds participated in a study. Researchers measured bone mass and analyzed the structure of the hip and thigh bone. Physical activity was assessed for seven days.

According to Science Daily:

“The results showed that there was a relationship between time spent in vigorous activity and strength of the femoral neck, both in terms of shape and volumetric mineral density. This was independent of other factors such as diet, lifestyle and physical size.”

Poor form during exercise can end up frequently hurting your knees and cause you to develop problems like patellofemoral pain (PFP) which frequently occurs in female runners. PFP occurs when your thigh bone starts rubbing against the back of your knee cap while running.According to a pilot study, this type of pain can be reduced or even eliminated simply by strengthening your hips.Granted, this was a very small, preliminary study, but your body almost always has the innate ability to rebalance itself when something is out of alignment, so the theory is quite plausible.The key is to determine which area needs to be strengthened to correct the imbalance.In this case, the theory that strengthening your hips to improve your gait, which in turn might correct the form error that contributes to PFP, makes sense, as stronger hips will help reduce the severity of the “q” angle on your leg alignment. The q angle is more severe on women because the distance between a woman’s femur bones is greater for child-bearing reasons.  This ends up putting more pressure on women’s knee joints. The hip-strengthening exercises prescribed during this study involved single-leg squats and resistance band exercises, twice a week for 30-45 minutes, for six weeks. The results were surprisingly positive as the majority of the runners no longer experienced onset of pain when running at the end of the trial.

So, if knee pain is bothering seek out a “qualified ” professional who can evaluate you to find your imbalances and prescribe an appropriate exercise program for you.  Hint – if your laying on a table or the floor doing various leg lifts you are in the WRONG place!

Life is a sport. Get Strong! Stay Strong!

Chris

Great post by my good friend Adam Brush

Just so we’re on the same page, baseball is a rotational sport. So while recently looking over a collegiate baseball summer training program I couldn’t help but notice Olympic lifts were included. Really?
Olympic lifting is a sport in and of itself that includes lifts such as the Snatch and the Clean & Jerk. These lifts require a tremendous amount of technique and demand a high level of skill specific to the sport of Olympic lifting.
So why are these movements/exercises finding their way into the world of baseball training? I know, I know Olympic lifts can create powerful hips; and they do…in the sagittal plane of motion – which is not the motion dominated in baseball. Baseball is dominated thru the transverse/rotational plane. I’ll say it again – from hitting, throwing and running – baseball is a rotational sport requiring rotational power training.
Structurally, Olympic lifts can create abnormal and high levels of joint stress – particularly thru the shoulders and wrists- (let’s not forget about the shear force that can be placed on the knees). I think we would all agree that the knees, shoulders and wrists are rather important to a ball player, and we wouldn’t want to risk an off-season injury.
I’m not against Olympic lifts – I MIGHT incorporate them(MAYBE) if an athlete has a good base and understanding of Olympic lifting. However, I haven’t seen too many baseball players having exposure, or even master these lifts. Therefore I ask myself how important is it to teach and incorporate a potentially “risky” movement in order to develop sagittal plane hip power when baseball is dominated by rotational hip power. In other words what’s the reward:risk ratio?
Now, Im not saying we shouldnt do any sagittal plane power training. I just believe that in order to save the shoulders, wrists and knees a safer alternative, such as box jumps, can be performedBUT IN CONJUNCTION with rotational power training. Furthermore, you may find that you are working with limited time so wouldnt you rather spend your time training for baseball than teaching exercises specific to the sport of Olympic lifting.
Go hard in the yard.

Life is a sport,

Get Strong! Stay Strong! (and dont forget to rotate!)

Chris