Posts Tagged ‘baseball’

Another good post from my good friend and awesome trainer Adam Brush.
From an October 18, 2011 article appearing on ESPN.com the 1st sentence, regarding the ban of tobacco in MLB, read like this-

“U.S. senators and health officials are taking on a baseball tradition older than the World Series itself: chewing tobacco on the diamond.”

Even though this can be a heavily debated topic, I think it’s imperative to share not only some of the eye-opening, harmful side effects from chewing (smokeless) tobacco but also the health benefits of a much healthier & smarter alternative: sunflower seeds.

CHEWING TOBACCO

1. Tooth decay & gum disease

2. Oral cancer of the mouth, cheeks, lips, tongue & throat

3. Reduced sense of taste; leading to an excessive intake of salts & sugars

4. Lung cancer

5. Increased heart rate & blood pressure

6. Negatively affects performance

SUNFLOWER SEEDS

1. Sunflower seeds are high in the “good” unsaturated fat, making them a great heart healthy snack.

2. healthy source of dietary fiber.

3. sunflower seeds contain vitamin E, thiamin (B1), magnesium, ; plus a host of other nutrients

3. Contains sodium. Yes salt. Baseball players often find themselves playing in extreme hot, humid conditions and according to Ginny Erwin, Sports Dietician, the lack of sodium under such conditions can place the ball player at risk for developing a sodium imbalance leading to muscle cramps and poor performance.

Choose smart, eat healthy…and reach for the seeds.

Go hard in the yard – Adam Brush

Get Strong! Stay Strong!
Chris
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Her is a great post from my good friend Adam Brush, top trainer at the Institute for Human Performance and Five Tool Baseball.

There’s no doubt that the core/trunk of a baseball player takes on a fair amount of rotational stress when it comes to on-field movements such as throwing, hitting, running.

To train for the rotational demands placed on the core we’ll structure Superset combinations, in which core integration is a major part of each exercise. The following PUSH/PULL combination is one such superset combination capable of developing the necessary core stiffness & strength a ball player will need to perform those on-field rotational movements.

SUPERSET

1-ARM(1A) DUMBBELL(DB) FLAT BENCH PRESS:
In addition to the strength development for the chest and triceps, proper execution and control of this unilateral movement will have a great influence on shoulder stability and core stiffness.

 

 

 

 

 

1-ARM, STAGGERED STANCE (S/S) CABLE ROW:
In addition to strength development for the back, posterior shoulder & biceps, this exercise is driven thru the extremely important transverse plane. In addition, the hip flexor of the rear leg is lengthened when the same side glutes are activated. This lengthening of the hip flexor becomes of great importance to hamstrings.

 

 
In addition, a similar 1A superset combination can be performed by implementing a 1A Incline DB press followed by a 1A “high to low” cable row
Stay tuned for a future blog that outlines a PULL/PUSH rotational superset combination.

Out train the game!

Posted by AB at 5:40 PM

Great post by my good friend Adam Brush

Just so we’re on the same page, baseball is a rotational sport. So while recently looking over a collegiate baseball summer training program I couldn’t help but notice Olympic lifts were included. Really?
Olympic lifting is a sport in and of itself that includes lifts such as the Snatch and the Clean & Jerk. These lifts require a tremendous amount of technique and demand a high level of skill specific to the sport of Olympic lifting.
So why are these movements/exercises finding their way into the world of baseball training? I know, I know Olympic lifts can create powerful hips; and they do…in the sagittal plane of motion – which is not the motion dominated in baseball. Baseball is dominated thru the transverse/rotational plane. I’ll say it again – from hitting, throwing and running – baseball is a rotational sport requiring rotational power training.
Structurally, Olympic lifts can create abnormal and high levels of joint stress – particularly thru the shoulders and wrists- (let’s not forget about the shear force that can be placed on the knees). I think we would all agree that the knees, shoulders and wrists are rather important to a ball player, and we wouldn’t want to risk an off-season injury.
I’m not against Olympic lifts – I MIGHT incorporate them(MAYBE) if an athlete has a good base and understanding of Olympic lifting. However, I haven’t seen too many baseball players having exposure, or even master these lifts. Therefore I ask myself how important is it to teach and incorporate a potentially “risky” movement in order to develop sagittal plane hip power when baseball is dominated by rotational hip power. In other words what’s the reward:risk ratio?
Now, Im not saying we shouldnt do any sagittal plane power training. I just believe that in order to save the shoulders, wrists and knees a safer alternative, such as box jumps, can be performedBUT IN CONJUNCTION with rotational power training. Furthermore, you may find that you are working with limited time so wouldnt you rather spend your time training for baseball than teaching exercises specific to the sport of Olympic lifting.
Go hard in the yard.

Life is a sport,

Get Strong! Stay Strong! (and dont forget to rotate!)

Chris

Exercise to improve your baseball and golf swing, tennis stroke, and hockey slap shot. —Mens Health Magazine

A powerful rotational turn will give you an extra 10 yards off the tee or 10 mph on your fastball. Exercises to boost that strength are overlooked but important. “Most sports require stabilization, strength, and power through some type of rotation,” says Tyler Wallace, NASM-C.P.T., of the National Academy of Sports Medicine. Here are the exercises Wallace recommends for powering up some key sports moves.

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Baseball Swing    Standing cable rotation.     Stand between the weight stacks of a cable station. Grab both ends of a rope handle attached to the midlevel pulley. Keeping your elbows bent, rotate your body to the left. Pause, then return to the starting position. Do three sets of 10 reps on each side.

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Baseball Pitch     Medicine-ball lift.     Lift a medicine ball from your chest to above your shoulder, rotating your hips and pivoting your back foot as you go. Pause when your arms are straight, then lower the ball. Do three sets of 10 reps on both sides.

images_2            images_3

Golf Swing          Swiss-ball Russian twist.    Lie with your shoulder blades and head on a Swiss ball and your feet flat on the floor. Hold your arms straight above you and clasp your hands together. Slowly rotate your shoulders to the left until your arms are roughly parallel to the floor. Pause, then rotate to the right. Do two sets of 15 repetitions.

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Tennis Stroke    Standing medicine-ball rotation chop.     Hold a medicine ball overhead with your arms straight. Keeping them straight, swing your arms down as if to throw the ball to the outside of each foot. Do four sets of eight repetitions on each side.

images            images_5     (couldnt find pic of someone doing this laying on swiss ball)

Hockey Slap Shot    Single-arm Swiss-ball rotation row.    Grab a dumbbell and lie facedown on a Swiss ball. With the weight in your right hand, let your right arm hang down. Place your other hand on your hip. Pull the weight up toward your chest as you rotate your upper body to the right. Pause, then slowly return to the starting position. Do two sets of 15 with each arm.

Great examples of matching an exercise to a specific activity to improve performance!  The same can be done for almost any activity.  Be creative and break out of the body building mentality!

Get Strong! Stay Strong!

Chris

Here is a great post from my good friend Adam who trains many high school and professional athletes down in Florida.

As stated in my previous Training to the 5th Power blog, I commented on the importance of multi-joint training. As baseball players we cannot underestimate the importance of stromng forearms. However, in various baseball performance training circles wrist curls, a single joint exercise usually performed sitting dow and having minimal, if any, core involvement seems to be the exercise of choice for creating strong forearms. In my opinion a more advantageous way to train for forearm strength is via grip strength. I know this is going to sound real obvious, but…the grip strength necessary for hitting and throwing works in unison, not isolation, with the rest of the body. Therefore, training forearms with a single joint, isolated exercise ( like wrist curls) just doesnt make sense. Instead perform multi-joint exercies/movements that requires grip strength as a by product. One such exercise that also targets the core, is the recline row. Peforming this exercise greatly challenges grip strength so much that grip strength (or the lack of) becomes the limiting factor, not necessarily the prime movers, when knocking out the reps on this movement. The recline row can be performed by utlizing nautical ropes (from gym class days) or, my favorite, the JC 2.5″ clamp grip with JC 48″ specialty straps, designed by JC Santana. Visit http://www.ihpfit.com/ for these and other training tools.


Be sure to maintain alignment from shoulders to ankles. Start at a body angle of approximately 45 degrees progressing to an advanced level or angle almost paralell to the floor. Each level will challenge grip strength thus developing strong forearms.

Go hard in the yard.
Adam
Get Strong! Stay Strong!
Chris