Archive for the ‘exercise’ Category

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Just a reminder to check out new post @ http://www.sportsmedandfitnessfanatic.blogspot.com.

Ill be doing all my posting on the new site.  Head over and click to follow.  Many exciting things coming!

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Get Strong! Stay Strong!

Chris

Hey Gang just a note to click over and subscribe/follow/bookmark my new blog  www.sportsmedandfitnessfanatic.blogspot.com

Same great content, just a new platform.

 

See you there!

 

Get Strong! Stay Strong!

Chris

 

 

 

 

Im jacked only 6 more days! Not that the program is all that bad, but I am “jonesing” for pizza and a good cup of coffee. Energy still is high and my body feels great.
Here is a simple and delicious recipe (credit to M. Saiia)I ate over the weekend.   I put some diced or shredded chicken in a pan w/ cut up potatoes, red and yellow peppers and added a container of Aldi’s southwestern salsa ( yes Aldi’s, it some of the best store bought salsa ive ever eaten).  Let it simmer and then chowed!  Tastey and very hearty!  Since im able to eat chicken now it made a great addition to the meal.

Todays workout:

Supersets (of course)          1 arm dumbbell squat to hi pull 8x L and R w/ Cable pull overs laying on incline bench x 12   (3 sets)

Floor Bench x 6 (see previous post on benefits for floor bench) w/ 2 kettlebell front squats x 8  (3 sets)

Close grip bench x 8 w/ barbell bicep curls x 10  (3 sets)

Fast and effective!      45 – 60  minutes and 447 calories.  Dont forget its the calories burned during recovery that is actually more impressive.

Get Strong! Stay Strong!

Chris

 

 

 

 

TGIF!  Able to add lean protein into the mix which will add some variety and expand my food choice, although I think I,m going to stick w/ beans and just a little chix and fish sparingly.  Luckily I’m one that can eat the same thing over and over.

Firdays consist of a 6:30am workout.  Today I superset :

Hang Clean for 8 w/ Pull ups for 10  (3 sets)

1 arm barbell deadlift using thick gripper 5x each side w/ Inverted shoulder press on total gym for 8-10  (3 sets)

Seated DB curls using grippers w/ Dips w/ knee tucks up/over bar x 12 (3 sets)

Finished w/ a few random ab exercises for good measure and to tone up the midsection that is lean from the purification!

As always followed workout w/ monster fruit smoothie w/ whey protein and cleanse powder.

I must say im pleasantly surprised at how good I feel and the energy I have despite NO caffeine!  Amazing.

Get Strong! Stay Strong!

Chris

RECLINE ROW  By Adam Brush – Performance coach at IHP and creator of FiveToolBaseball.blogspot.com

One of my favorite exercises that strengthens the posterior chain musculature, responsible to decelerate the arm during a throw, is the RECLINE ROW.


This exercise creates back strength, shoulder stability, core stiffness, and even grip strength (when modalities such as ropes are incorporated) all of which are important to the baseball player. In addition, maintaining proper body alignment requires the ability to isometrically sustain hip extension along with glute activation which encourages lengthening of the hip flexors which is important for creating healthy hamstrings.

Stay Strong!

Out Train the Game

 Get Strong! Stay Strong!
Chris

Santa is not the only one to use a sled!  The weighted sled can be used in rehab for lower extremity strength, endurance and makes a great core activator. Every patient suffering a significant injury to the lower extremity needs to restore integrated movement, strength, endurance and power. With the sled fastened around the waist and the sled towed behind leg drive and posterior chain strength can be developed for gait and transition into running. It simulates walking up hill without the hill. In addition it will get that heart rate jacked in a hurry!  Walking backward will really fire up the quads.  Now to use the sled for core strength and activation, I just put handles on the ends of the ropes where the waist band attaches. We can now repeat our walks holding the arms chest level or outstretched in front.


 

 

 

The resistance is now pulling back through the arms that have to be stabilized by the core as your legs are still driving forward, not to mention an even greater metabolic demand!  Walking forward activates more of the abdominals and walking backwards (holding the handles) will activate more of the posterior core muscles.  It also give you some additional bonus shoulder and arm work.  A shoulder harness is a great alternative to the handles although not as demanding.

 

 

 

 

I am a big fan of asymmetrical loading due to the increased demand for stability and its relation to “real life” activity/movement.  So, here are just a few of many tweaks to the sled I use.

                  

 

 

 

1 arm push                                     1 arm pull                        over shld pull

So, as you can see (hopefully)  these exercises can be used in rehab for the upper extremity, core or lower extremity.

Get Strong! Stay Strong!

Chris

Her is a great post from my good friend Adam Brush, top trainer at the Institute for Human Performance and Five Tool Baseball.

There’s no doubt that the core/trunk of a baseball player takes on a fair amount of rotational stress when it comes to on-field movements such as throwing, hitting, running.

To train for the rotational demands placed on the core we’ll structure Superset combinations, in which core integration is a major part of each exercise. The following PUSH/PULL combination is one such superset combination capable of developing the necessary core stiffness & strength a ball player will need to perform those on-field rotational movements.

SUPERSET

1-ARM(1A) DUMBBELL(DB) FLAT BENCH PRESS:
In addition to the strength development for the chest and triceps, proper execution and control of this unilateral movement will have a great influence on shoulder stability and core stiffness.

 

 

 

 

 

1-ARM, STAGGERED STANCE (S/S) CABLE ROW:
In addition to strength development for the back, posterior shoulder & biceps, this exercise is driven thru the extremely important transverse plane. In addition, the hip flexor of the rear leg is lengthened when the same side glutes are activated. This lengthening of the hip flexor becomes of great importance to hamstrings.

 

 
In addition, a similar 1A superset combination can be performed by implementing a 1A Incline DB press followed by a 1A “high to low” cable row
Stay tuned for a future blog that outlines a PULL/PUSH rotational superset combination.

Out train the game!

Posted by AB at 5:40 PM

Great article I came across on Mike Mahlers website written by Sarah Cheatham

Nerve Glides mobilize and tension the nerves through a range of motion. Which can be thought of as joint mobility but for your nerves. Nerves are high-threat and thus high-priority for your CNS (central nervous system). This means that if something goes wrong with a nerve you know pretty quickly.

For example: Sciatica pain. The sciatica is a nerve that runs from your low back (lumbar plexus) down the back of your thigh, into your calf, and ends up in branches in your feet. You know when it has been compromised. Often the important nerve gets pinched from excessive compression via heavy squatting, bad lifting, poor rotation, a large gut, high heeled shoes, etc. Most often, the sciatica is pinched by lumbar stenosis. Lumbar stenosis is narrowing of the lumbar nerve canals and too often occurs because of shoe choice. Anything that elevates the heel forces everything up the chain to adjust.

So think about this: your heel is elevated (the point of initial impact of your body and the earth). To propel you forward, the energy transmits up to your knee, but with an elevated heel the knee is already pitched forward. In a barefoot step, the knee starts from extension, then flexes, then goes into full extension. In a heel-raised knee, the knee starts in flexion, goes to semi-extension (in other words: still in flexion) then finishes in flexion. There’s no good chance for the knee to go through its full range of motion. So you’re selling your mobility short here, at the first joint up from the ground. This means you have knee and low back pain…Your shoes are limiting your mobility and this is the reason you have knee and back pain. There is nothing wrong with your knee, it’s over-working because you chose some silly shoes.

We’ll move up to the pelvis from the knee and by-pass the hip for now. What happens in the pelvis with a raised-heel (because of your cute shoes …that were on sale)? The pelvis tilts forward. You see a great example of this in pregnant women and pot-bellied men. But it happens in your body when you wear high, or semi-high heels, Nike Shox (and the like) or even combat or cowboy boots. This means that lower belly you just can’t seem to get rid of with all those crunches is really a result of your shoes. When your pelvis tilts forward, all that is in it has to adjusts too. In other words, save for your skin & fascia, your guts would spill forward out of your low-belly. A graphic description, I know, but it proves a point. Are those shoes really that cute now? May I remind you they give you a belly “pooch,” the one ladies are forever complaining about not being able to get rid of despite countless “core” work. And it goes beyond high heels, to elevated heel tennis shoes.

With the pelvis pitched forward, the low back has an excessive curve in it: lordosis, technically. Meaning an exaggerated curvature of the low back. That curve is what’s putting the pinch on your sciatica, amongst other nerves that live in your low back. Remember, this is all because your heel is elevated up off the ground…even slightly. Our bodies are so smart, that they will adapt to a demand (walking in high heels or running in shox) without us asking. But you can see it comes at a price…and it’s all your fault.

What’s the significance of poor shoe choice, joint mobility, and what can you do to help yourself?

Often smaller branches of the sciatica down in the feet go unused and can even of die off due to the stenosis caused by poor shoe choice and the resulting poor posture and gait. This, in addition to chronic low back pain and decreased training performance. If you don’t mobilize the joints the nerves feed through, (in this case the lumbar & hip joints for the sciatica), we get disuses injuries (see: sprained and twisted ankles, muscular atrophy, weakness and imbalances). The answer to getting the most out of your body for a lifetime: Specific joint mobility and flat-soled shoes regardless of your chosen activity.

Specific joint mobility done with intention will gently mobilize the nerves that feed through the joints and therby significantly enhance your brain/body coordination!

Get Strong! Stay Strong!
Chris